Lindy

Lindy

Meet Lindy
FIV Positive Kitty
Love cuddling? Lindy is your gal. A total lover — she likes nothing more than to curl up and snuggle in a lap! Lindy is young (<1 year old), super affectionate and playful. She falls in love with everyone she meets (it’s often mutual) and does great with kids (currently lives with a 4-year-old). Lindy would make a wonderful companion for a forever family that will commit to giving her lots of affection, a high quality diet, and staying on top of her health. Lindy has been living with her foster family for 4 months, working on recovering from a slightly protruding rectum. She has improved a lot, and now her rectum only protrudes slightly after she defecates, most of the time looking normal. She uses the litter box normally and this doesn’t bother her. She recently saw a specialist and they believe this is something she probably developed as a kitten and don’t recommend any further treatment. She came to us as a stray from animal control. They noticed that her rectal tissue was puckered a little bit more than usual. We did countless tests and treatments and finally went to a specialist who believes that she likely had diarrhea as a kitten and strained so much she had some nerve damage. She does not have any issue with her bathroom habits and uses the litter box like a champ. She is starting to revert her tissue back in now so her nerves are likely healing. She is on a special food to keep her gut happy. We know no one likes to talk about these things, but please do not let this deter you from adopting! Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a virus that affects only cats. It is similar to HIV in humans, in that it is progressive, has a long incubation period, and suppresses the immune system. So far, there isn’t any treatment, but cats with FIV often live normal, healthy lives. This doesn’t mean they will never become ill, they are immunocompromised, so illnesses can be easier to catch and harder to fight off. They have the same needs as any other cat: high quality nutrition, a clean, stress-free, strictly indoor environment, regular veterinary visits (two times per year), and lots of love. If they should become ill, they are generally treated earlier, longer, and more aggressively than non-immunocompromised cats (meaning they need to see the vet at the very first sign of illness and may be on a stronger medication or on medication for a longer period of time). To be completely safe, she should go to a home with no other cats or other FIV cats. However, the newest data says that as long as there are no aggressive fights, FIV+ cats can live in the same house holds as negative cats. FIV is only inherited from birth or passed by deep bites. Adoption fee is $150 Adoption application available at rpaw.org